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Free Guide – Posture for Singers

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Posture

It is very important to consider your posture when you sing.   You use your voice as an instruments, and like all instruments, you should know how to hold them correctly.   When we sing, we use our heads, throats, chest and abdomen to create our sound, so it is important that we maintain a posture that benefits these areas.

It is difficult to draw in to the bottom of your lungs if you are sitting down, so stand up.

Stand tall, with your shoulders back and let your arms dangle loosely by your side.

Keep your head up so that it opens your airway

Feel yourself being pulled upwards from your navel to the top of your head, so that you create more space for air in your lungs

Try standing with your knees unlocked and with one foot slightly in front of the other, about shoulder width apart

Try to keep your abdomen muscles tight

Relax but don’t slouch!

Audition Advice

Audition Advice

Whether you wish to be the next superstar, or just want a place in a band, choir or musical production, having a successful singing audition will help you achieve your dream.   So many people turn up for auditions totally unprepared and are just setting themselves up for failure, yet with a little bit of homework, you could greatly increase your chances of being selected.

 Know what you are committing to

Some groups/shows/competitions require more than others.  For example a local choir probably meets one evening a week, and if you could put in some extra practice now and again, that’s great.  A TV talent show on the other hand could tie you up for several months.  Eg. Lets say you get through all the selection process and you get to appear on the live shows,  you will spend lots of time away from home/work in rehearsals as well as the shows.  Can you commit yourself to that?

You will greatly improve your chances if you are available, as a director is going to want someone reliable, as often the rehearsal couldn’t go ahead without all the team being available.

Select the right song

Choosing an audition song is difficult.  It needs to show off your voice and your singing abilities, suit the genre of what you are auditioning for, and possibly it needs to stand out from the crowd.

Your song shouldn’t be too easy, but also don’t pick something so difficult, that you struggle to sing it.

Also have a back up song, just incase you are asked to sing something else as well.

Something else to mention here about choosing audition songs.  If there are several rounds to your audition, then reserve one of your better songs for later in the selection process.  It will help pace yourself, and you know you can pull an Ace out of the bag when you need it most.

Make sure you know your song (s) off by heart, inside out and back-to-front.  Auditions are nerve-racking situations, don’t make it worse for yourself by forgetting your place or your lyrics

Be Prepared

An audition is not just about choosing the right song.  Do yourself a few favours and research what you are auditioning for.  Use the internet, to research about the group/competition, listen to the songs, watch video clips and possibly buy the sheet music to learn if it’s available.

Practice looking confident.  It will help you when your nerves kick in during the audition.  Walk tall and with purpose. Practice a few smiles and poses in front of a mirror. Learn to make eye contact, it will make you look sincere. If you practice enough, it will become second nature to you.

If you are using sheet music or backing tracks for your audition. Make sure they have your name on it, and that they are clearly labeled.  If you are using a musical score, make sure the accompanist can clearly see where you want to come in, and where you want to end (usually 16 bars).

If there is a dance element to your audition, make sure you have your dance kit packed ready, and don’t forget your shoes.  Also don’t forget a hairbrush and makeup if you wear it, etc to do some touch ups before your audition.

Auditions can be long days.  Make sure you take something to eat and drink.  There’s not always facilities to buy something when you get there.

Try to have a good night’s sleep the night before your audition, so that you are feeling your best, rather than having a night on the tiles.

Plan your journey so that you arrive in plenty of time for your audition.  There’s nothing worse than being late and completely missing your slot.

Make sure you have some warm-up scales on your mp3 player, to that you can warm-up your voice before you go in for your audition.  Some auditions have a place available for this, otherwise opt for the next best thing – the toilets seem to be a good a place as any, as many TV auditions seem to show.  By warming up your voice, it will help prevent your voice from cracking and croaking, it will also help calm your nerves and give you something to focus on.

Be presentable

Your appearance does make a difference and how you present yourself will show the auditioner(s) how seriously you want to be taken. Make sure what you are wearing is comfortable and allows you to move (and breathe in some cases!) to give your best performance.  Don’t wear killer heels unless you can walk or perform in them confidently.  You don’t want to be the one remembered for falling over.

Make an effort to look nice, but don’t go overboard.  Unless there is a dress code, smart casual usually works, a bit of makeup if you wear it, clean shoes, neat hair, and cover up too much flesh.  The auditioner want to see you, and what you can do, not how expensive your revealing dress is.  Also don’t use gimmicks like fancy dress costumes.  They will just make you stick out, and look like you’re not taking the audition seriously.  Also – you not going to get the part just because you own part of the wardrobe.

Be personable

Your audition can possibly start from the time you arrive at the venue, especially so in the case of TV talent shows.  You are being assessed by researchers, who are out looking for who/what they want long before you even get to sing.  You should always be pleasant, friendly and eager to be there.  Try to be approachable at all times.

When you are eventually called in for your audition, smile, look at them and say hello.  You will be guided as to where you need to stand and when to start.   Sing to your auditioner, make a little eye contact, but don’t stare them out so they feel threatened or uncomfortable.

The auditioner may well interrupt you before you have finished.   It is usually because they’ve heard what they need to hear.  They may or may not ask you for a second song if they’re not quite sure about you.  This will show them how much you’ve prepared for this audition.

When you have finished, they may give you some feedback there and then as to how you done, or what you could do to increase your chance for next time.  Listen to what they have to say and take it on board.  Don’t be rude or defensive.  They are only trying to help. Also don’t forget to thank them for their time.  It’s a long day for them too.

Aim high and work harder

Be prepared to work harder and longer at what you want to achieve.

Get some vocal coaching to help you with your singing and your audition technique.

Spend time in front of a mirror practicing moves and facial expressions.  The more you practice, the easier and more natural it becomes.

Listen to any comments or feedback about your audition, and take them onboard, if you made a mistake, learn from it.

Don’t make any excuses for your lack of preparation when being auditioned eg, I’m sorry I don’t know how this bit goes, or sorry I haven’t had time to practice.  It is only going to show you up as someone who couldn’t be bothered, and if you can’t be bothered, then why should the auditioner.

If you are genuinely ill, don’t make excuses for it. The auditioner will see you are suffering and is more likely to view you in a more positive way for not moaning about it.

Remember you may only have one chance to make that impression. From the moment you walk onto the stage you are being assessed.  If you come across as a positive, fun and friendly person, who has done their homework, you will greatly improve your chances of being selected as a team member.  However, if you fail to get selected this time, it doesn’t always mean you didn’t sing well. Often it is down to you are not what the auditioner was looking for this time.  Please don’t give up. Keep at it. Try, try again and one day you will succeed.

© Successful Singing